Construction

Alexander Bagne, CPA, JD, MBA, CCSP is the President of ICS Tax, LLC, and an expert in tax planning strategies for real estate investors, architecture and engineering firms, and others within the construction industry. He is a strong proponent of energy efficient construction and has served as the President of the American Society of Cost Segregation Professionals (ASCSP). This article was re-published from ICS-tax.com ‘The Inflation Reduction Act Significantly Changes the 179D Energy Efficient Commercial Building Deduction’" target="_blank">Section 179D Energy Efficient Commercial Building Deduction

The Section 179D Energy Efficient Commercial Building Deduction provides a deduction of up to $1.88 per square foot for both building owners who construct new [...]

By |2022-09-27T15:05:40-05:00September 19th, 2022|AM Whitepaper, CICPAC, Construction|

KEY ASPECTS OF CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNTING THAT MAKE IT UNIQUE

  1. Job Costing
  2. Sales and Costs of Sales Categories (diret / indirect / committed)
  3. Revenue Recognition (5 steps to recognize revenue, cash / accrual / percentage of completion method, ASC 606 standards)
  4. Mobile Workforce
  5. Payroll Requirements (prevailing wage, union and multi-level payroll)
  6. Retainage
[/fusion_text][fusion_button link="https://www.deltek.com/en/construction-accounting" title="" target="_self" link_attributes="" alignment_medium="" alignment_small="" alignment="" modal="" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" sticky_display="normal,sticky" class="" id="" color="default" button_gradient_top_color="" hue="" saturation="" lightness="" alpha="" button_gradient_bottom_color="" button_gradient_top_color_hover="" button_gradient_bottom_color_hover="" gradient_start_position="" gradient_end_position="" gradient_type="" radial_direction="" linear_angle="180" accent_color="" accent_hover_color="" type="" bevel_color="" bevel_color_hover="" border_top="" border_right="" border_bottom="" border_left="" border_radius_top_left="" border_radius_top_right="" border_radius_bottom_right="" border_radius_bottom_left="" border_color="" border_hover_color="" size="" padding_top="" padding_right="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" fusion_font_family_button_font="" fusion_font_variant_button_font="" font_size="" line_height="" letter_spacing="" text_transform="" stretch="default" margin_top="" margin_right="" margin_bottom="" margin_left="" icon="" icon_position="left" icon_divider="no" animation_type="" animation_direction="left" animation_speed="0.3" animation_offset=""]Dive into the 6 Key Aspects[/fusion_button][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]" target="_blank">The Complete Guide to Construction Accounting

If you're in the construction industry, you know that accounting and financial management can be more complex than in other industries. In this guide, [...]

By |2022-08-30T13:23:26-05:00August 30th, 2022|AM Whitepaper, CICPAC, Construction|

The Inflation Reduction Act of 2022, H.R. 5376, signed by President Biden on August 16, 2022, extended the 45L credit for homes sold or leased during 2022 with little modification. Thus, residences sold or leased in 2022 would qualify for the 45L credit using the 2021 energy efficiency standards. However, from January 1, 2023 through December 31, 2032, the Act significantly changes the 45L Energy Efficient Home Credit with new provisions and requirements. Beginning in 2023, the Act provides an increased 45L tax credit of $2,500 for single family and manufactured homes when constructed according to the standards set by the ENERGY STAR Residential New Construction Program or the Manufactured Homes Program.
  • Single-family homes must meet the ENERGY STAR Single Family New Homes Program, Version 3.1 for homes constructed before January 1, 2025 and Version 3.2 thereafter.
  • Manufactured homes must meet the latest ENERGY STAR Manufactured Home National Program requirements as in effect on the latter of January 1, 2023 or January 1 of two calendar years prior to the date the dwelling is acquired.
The Act also provides an even higher 45L tax credit of $5,000 for single family and manufactured homes when they are certified as a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH). For multifamily homes constructed after 2022, the Act provides a 45L tax credit of $500 when meeting the ENERGY STAR Single Family New Homes Program or $1,000 when meeting the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home requirements. If prevailing wage requirements are also satisfied, the credit for multifamily homes increases to $2,500 or $5,000, respectively. The table below summarizes the 45L Credit rules beginning in 2023.
Home Type Qualification Requirement Prevailing Wage Requirement Credit Amount
Single Family* EnergyStar No $2,500
Single Family* ZERH No $5,000
Manufactured Home EnergyStar No $2,500
Manufactured Home ZERH No $5,000
Multifamily EnergyStar No $500
Multifamily ZERH No $1,000
Multifamily EnergyStar Yes $2,500
Multifamily ZERH Yes $5,000
*Single Family includes site-built and modular single family homes, duplexes and townhomes.
The Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 has certainly raised the standards for energy efficient home construction with a persuasive tax credit for the next ten years.
This article was re-published from ICS-tax.com ‘The Inflation Reduction Act: Impact on §45L Tax Credit’

About the Author:

Alexander Bagne, CPA, JD, MBA, CCSP is the President of ICS Tax, LLC and an expert in tax planning strategies for real estate investors and developers. He is a proponent of energy efficient construction and has served as the President of the American Society of Cost Segregation Professionals (ASCSP).
" target="_blank">The Inflation Reduction Act: Impact on §45L Tax Credit

Internal Revenue Code Section 45L provides both single and multifamily homebuilders with a $2,000 tax credit for meeting certain energy saving requirements. However, the 45L [...]

By |2022-09-27T15:07:00-05:00August 19th, 2022|AM Whitepaper, CICPAC, Construction|

prevailing wage is typically based on the wages paid to workers on similar projects in the area. The act was intended to avoid situations where contractors would low-ball their proposed costs on a project at the expense of their workers’ wages. There are several states that have their own prevailing wage laws, known as “little Davis-Bacon” acts, for any state-funded construction projects and do, in some cases, extend to projects at the local and municipalities level as well.

So prevailing wage is basically a worker’s hourly wage?

Yes and no. Prevailing wage comprises two parts: The first is the basic hourly rate paid to each worker. The second is what is known as the “fringe benefits” amount. Fringe benefits include a separate per-hour dollar amount paid out as part of a worker’s wages or used to fund a “bona fide” benefits plan, such as a 401(k), life and health insurance, vacation, and holiday pay, or even apprenticeship training programs. Simply put, if a worker’s base pay on a project was $30 an hour and the fringe benefits amount was $10 an hour, the contractor can pay out the $10 in fringe benefits as wages, essentially increasing the worker’s hourly pay to $40, or they can elect to put that $10 into a benefits plan for their employee.

So, which is better — cash or a bona fide benefits plan?

Many contractors pay out the mandatory fringe benefit as wages because it’s the easiest way to comply with the law. While that may be true, it’s also much more costly to the contractor. And the reason is pretty simple: all wages paid to employees are subject to payroll taxes, such as social security taxes, federal and state unemployment taxes, workers’ compensation insurance, and general liability insurance. The rate varies, but it is estimated that the additional cost to the contractor for these payroll taxes is roughly 25 cents for every dollar paid in wages. On the other hand, if a contractor uses those fringe dollars to fund a “bona fide” benefits plan for their employees, that money would be exempt from all payroll taxes. Thus saving the contractor tens of thousands, maybe even hundreds of thousands, of dollars a year. Don’t believe me? Here’s an example: Let’s say Contractor A has 25 employees working on a prevailing wage job that will last six months. Each employee works approximately 500 hours during this time, and the fringe amount is roughly $10 an hour. 25 (employees) x 500 hours = 12,500 hours 12,500 (hours) x $10 fringe benefit dollars = $125,000 fringe benefit dollars If Contractor A decides to pay out that $125,000 fringe benefit as wages to their employees, they will be hit with a 25% payroll tax on every single one of those dollars. $125,000 x 25% in payroll taxes = $31,250 in additional payroll taxes If Contractor A elects to put those fringe benefit dollars into a “bona fide” benefits plan for her employees, such as a 401(k) retirement account, not a single dollar would be subject to payroll taxes. That means $31,250 in savings, which can be used later to make more competitive bids for future projects. Using these fringe dollars properly also allows a contractor to implement or improve their existing benefit programs in a few ways:
  1. For those employers who offer a 401(k), paying the fringes as cash means funding the benefits in duplicity, as these payments are paid out of the operational account of the business. Using these fringe dollars to an employer and employee’s advantage can reduce that extra expense considerably.
  2. In today’s tight labor market, employees look at total compensation packages, including benefits like a 401(k). These fringe dollars can assist companies with bolstering their current programs by offering better benefit coverages or adding additional benefit options for their employees.
  3. Employers can improve their 401(k) plan by using fringe dollars to offset or meet matching requirements they may choose to include. This includes discretionary employer match, safe harbor, or profit-sharing contributions to the plan. Contractors often hesitate to include matching contributions to their retirement plan due to the costs. Utilizing the prevailing wage dollars to meet a portion of these contributions allows you to offer more retirement benefits to all your employees at a reduced cost to the company.
Required annual compliance testing for all 401(k) plans can be extremely complicated and are put into place to ensure that all participants benefit equally from the plan. When working with a plan administrator specializing in designing retirement plans for prevailing wage contractors, you can be confident that you are staying compliant and offering the best solution for all your employees and the company owners. In the end, when utilized correctly, prevailing wage — comprised of a per-hour cash wage and a per-hour benefits wage – is a significant benefit to both the laborers and contractors working on publicly-funded construction projects. Prevailing wage benefits isn’t easy business. For over 35 years, Beneco has focused exclusively on serving the unique needs of contractors through retirement plans, health care benefits, compliance services, and HR solutions and has a level of expertise in prevailing wage that few can offer.  " target="_blank">Maximize Prevailing Wage Dollars with an Employer Sponsored 401(k) Plan

Prevailing wage was established under federal law by the Davis-Bacon Act of 1931. The act mandates that contractors and subcontractors pay their workers an hourly [...]

By |2022-07-18T14:36:01-05:00July 18th, 2022|AM Whitepaper, CICPAC, Construction|

David Seibel & Tanner Niehaus, McGuire Sponsel The R&D Tax Credit is one of the most subjective areas of the tax code and many businesses believe they qualify. With the IRS placing more scrutiny on the R&D Tax Credit, it is important to be aware of common myths of the credit as well as areas of exposure when building a claim. To dispel some of these misconceptions and provide clear guidance for CPA firms and businesses that may qualify for the R&D Credit, this blog explores the construction sector and what activities and business practices are eligible for R&D Credit inclusion. The construction sector and related industries hold many misconceptions as it relates to the R&D Credit. For firms that are directly or indirectly involved with construction, there are a number of considerations for each individual company to make when evaluating if it is appropriate to pursue a R&D Credit claim. One early factor to examine is whether the business bears the burden of engineering or design at any point during the project cycle. This can often determine whether a business is likely to be working on projects that satisfy the four-part test. This check does not guarantee a R&D Credit opportunity exists, but the lack of design responsibility typically suggests that a company will not meet §41 requirements. A technical risk assessment for a “typical” project or large specialty project would also be appropriate to determine if there are potentially qualified business components. For example, within the scope of a new construction project, the party that is responsible for developing the optimal building design including the detailed engineering is very likely to be conducting qualified research activities. This could also extend to contractors who are designing specific systems for the site. Conversely, a contractor or builder that is constructing from prints and is not responsible for the creation of any new design element or construction procedure is typically not conducting qualified research. While qualified employees do not have to be degreed scientists or engineers, a firm that has an engineering and/or design function is a good indicator of qualified research taking place. Market areas that are most likely to be conducting qualifying activities include architectural/engineering firms, specialty and design/build contractors, and manufacturers of new and unique construction products. Beyond assessing if a business bears the burden of design and if technical risk is present, determining if a taxpayer bears the economic risk of the design is necessary when preparing a R&D Credit claim. This requirement is related to the Funded Research Exclusion as set forth in §41(d)(4)(H). When a company is designing a custom building or solution for a client, the payment structure should generally be fixed-fee, lump-sum, or otherwise structured in a way that the business incurs the costs to resolve any failure to demonstrate the taxpayer is bearing the economic risk. The company must also retain significant rights to use the research without compensation to its client. In recent years an architectural design firm, Populous Holdings, successfully defended its R&D Credit claims against the Funded Research Exclusion in tax court. The court found that because the contract payment structures were fixed fee and Populous Holdings was paid for a “work product” requiring research to successfully complete, the Funded Research Exclusion did not apply and the claims were valid. Between determining who bears the technical risk and economic risk of a project, as well as who retains substantial rights to the research, it can often be difficult to determine if a construction company is eligible to claim the R&D Credit for a particular project. An assessment of a taxpayer’s design responsibilities, project contracts, and work performed should be carefully conducted to determine whether a construction firm is able to claim the R&D Credit." target="_blank">R&D Tax Credits for the Construction Industry

Submitted by: David Seibel & Tanner Niehaus, McGuire Sponsel The R&D Tax Credit is one of the most subjective areas of the tax code and [...]

By |2022-07-18T14:36:01-05:00June 22nd, 2022|CICPAC, Construction, Resources|

Harness Software (a Foundation Software Company) on Apr 01, 2021 Forget the horse and water; the saying should read: “You can lead a construction worker through a safety program, but you cannot make them follow it.” The goal of any safety program is to reduce incidents, but in order to achieve that, the employees must actually follow the program. This is a challenge for many construction companies. Safety risks and the incidents that follow take place on construction sites for one of three possible reasons: 1. They Don’t Know Employees who simply don’t know all the safety information are more timid around the tools and equipment and are more likely to make a mistake due to lack of training. This is especially true of new hires. 2. They Don’t Care More experienced employees who have been on the job for a while, who have yet to experience an incident, can become overconfident and feel invincible, often leading to very risky behavior on their part. 3. There’s a More Efficient Way The most experienced workers on site have likely gone through an incident or accident themselves and are less likely to take major risks but have also developed more efficient / less safe habits over the years, potentially leading to an incident. > Continue Reading   Sue Drummond knows that learning new technology can be intimidating and overwhelming sometimes. That's exactly why her role at Harness Software is to teach, guide and customize the fear away. Together with our clients, she sets project priorities, exchanges resources and shares best practices, all in an effort to achieve happier and healthier employees and safer job sites.   About Foundation SoftwareFoundation Software delivers job cost accounting, project management, estimating & takeoff, and safety software, along with payroll services, to help contractors run the business side of construction. For more information, call (800) 246-0800 or email info@foundationsoft.com." target="_blank">3 Safety Program Styles Compared: Incentive vs Behavior vs Discipline

Last Updated by Sue Drummond, Harness Software (a Foundation Software Company) on Apr 01, 2021 Forget the horse and water; the saying should read: “You [...]

By |2022-07-18T14:36:01-05:00June 20th, 2022|AM Whitepaper, CICPAC, Construction, Exclude Post, Member News|

Chuck Schwartz, and Chris Porter, Construction Manager at Prophix, to discuss the challenges of resource management in the age of COVID-19 and expectations for recovery.

1. What are some of the resourcing challenges that you think are carrying over from COVID-19?

Chuck: A significant challenge was those businesses that use local server-based software systems (a.k.a. “in-house”) versus those that use accounting and business management software in the cloud. Those that use cloud software saw no significant delays or downtime, versus those that had to scramble to set up computers to be able to connect to their systems. Then, of course, with the office closures and lockdowns, important processes like system backups weren’t performed regularly, if at all. Chris: As so many of us know, labor shortages have been an ongoing issue in the construction industry for some time now. Much like a lot of things, COVID has only magnified this issue. However, it’s not just labor that will continue to be a challenge. Materials and equipment are also in high demand, and prices have risen considerably in both areas due to production slowdowns, amongst other things. This disruption will no doubt continue onwards for some time until production and supply levels can return to what they were pre-pandemic.

2. Based on the challenges mentioned above, what areas do you think construction companies should invest in to prepare for potential future disruptions? (i.e., software, scholarships, or trade programs to train new talent, safety protocols, education for project managers, etc.)

Chuck: There’s an old saying – do things in good times, so you are not scrambling in the bad times. And while these are certainly not quite the good times (at least not yet anyway), think back to just before the lockdown – we had good times. But then, I heard things like, “we are too busy to think about that now,” and other excuses for not doing some of the important things in the good times. So, if we learned anything from the lockdown is that life is unpredictable, and things can happen at any time. Taking care of the important things and the difficult things before disaster strikes is key. Chris: Chuck makes many good points here. Proactively investing in the right areas of your business will set you up for success down the road, no matter what challenges you’re faced with. It’s always nice to relish the good times, but organizations must think strategically about investing in their people, technology, and processes. On the technology side, construction companies use many different technologies to run their business. ERP, Estimating, Project Management, CRM, and Payroll software are just a few. You need all these systems to run your business and make decisions, but it’s tedious to jump from one system to the next to get the answers you need. Contractors should be investing in a data strategy and technology that pulls all their data together. This makes it possible for innovative contractors to see and respond to issues as they arise. Contractors should be able to easily model the impact of project delays, equipment or labor shortages, and the resulting cash flows across the entire business.

3. Are there any technology solutions that you think contractors would benefit from investing in, or if they already have, look for ways to utilize more?

Chuck: Aside from cloud CPM software, I would say an integrated construction ERP software. What I mean by this is that most construction accounting systems have always done a very good job at accounting, job costing, and financial reporting, but I am also seeing wonderful advancements made in the project management and document control side of things. Most of the contractors I speak with would prefer one system to manage their entire business, from accounting and back office, to project management, and out to the field. What I’ve seen recently from system vendors like Viewpoint is very impressive and eliminates the need for third-party project management systems. I will also share that what I’ve seen from Prophix and how they work with ERP systems to offer advanced opportunities for financial and statistical reporting is very impressive. CPM software is valuable to contractors who deal with things like PPP, ERC, and other reporting and forecasting needs. Chris: I completely agree with Chuck that without an integrated construction ERP software like Viewpoint, you’re not running your business as efficiently as you could be. However, I believe that this is only half the puzzle. You might feel burnt out after a long ERP implementation and think that’s it – but there’s more. Now, you have to consider how you’re going to consume all that great information. At the end of the day, relational data systems like ERPs are primarily meant for logging and storing large sets of data. Getting that data out and into a consumable and easy-to-understand format is where you will start to gain competitive advantages in the marketplace and make better decisions.

4. What areas of focus do you think contractors should be looking into regarding scheduling and staffing because of COVID restrictions?

Chris: One of the lessons I think we have all learned from this pandemic is that our situation can change at the drop of a hat. In many ways, this isn’t anything new to construction professionals who deal with scheduling changes on jobs all the time. What matters is your ability to understand where and when you can make changes to your scheduled labor and equipment ahead of time. Being able to reforecast your staffing levels and equipment usage well in advance will result in better utilization and margins on those key assets. So, the question we should be asking ourselves is, can I do this today? Moreover, can I report on my required, scheduled, and actual resource hours daily? This is where a data strategy comes into play. Connecting these 3 datasets is imperative, and thankfully, Prophix has a purpose-built solution to make this possible.

5. What should contractors be prepared for in 2021 once the vaccine has become more widely available?

Chris: In speaking with several sureties and accounting partners, there has already been an increased focus on cash management and financial health. Everyone is asking for more regular 13-week cash projections and updates on key performance indicators, such as days of cash and other liquidity ratios. Knowing this will likely continue in the foreseeable future, contractors need to consider the processes they have for putting this data together for stakeholders. Are you spending days and days getting this data out of various systems and crunching it in Excel? A bank or surety will have a lot more confidence if you’re able to show them the solid foundation upon which you have produced these numbers. Corporate Performance Management solutions, such as Prophix, provide contractors with the automation, scale, and best practices that Excel can’t offer. Out-of-the-box dashboards, coupled with a library of KPIs, can give contractors insight into the health of their business almost instantly. To learn more about resource management, watch our on-demand presentation, Navigating Challenges and Strategies Related to Construction Claims During a Pandemic, with Marcum, Viewpoint, and Prophix.

About Prophix

Your business is evolving. And the way you plan and report on your business should evolve too. Prophix helps mid-market companies achieve their goals more successfully with innovative, cloud-based Corporate Performance Management (CPM) software. With Prophix, finance leaders improve profitability and minimize risk by automating budgeting, forecasting and reporting and puts the focus back on what matters most – uncovering business opportunities. Prophix supports your future with AI innovation that flexes to meet your strategic realities, today and tomorrow. Over 1,500 global companies rely on Prophix to transform the way they work." target="_blank">Navigation the New Normal: Q&A with Construction Experts

Our Associate Member, Prophix, created this engaging Q&A and has allowed us to share with our membership. In 2020, the construction industry faced many different [...]

By |2022-07-18T14:36:01-05:00March 30th, 2021|CICPAC, Construction, Resources|

The Benefits of a Prevailing Wage 401(k) Plan

Contractors have the option of paying fringe dollars to their employees as cash wages or using the funds to provide qualified benefits to their employees. When paying fringe dollars as cash wages they are processed through payroll, leading to higher payroll taxes and workers’ compensation premiums. However, if the employer has a 401(k) plan with the ability to accept fringe dollars as employer contributions to the plan, fringe dollars can be removed from payroll, reducing payroll taxes and the cost of workers compensation premiums. This leads to a substantial labor cost savings for employees and an average of 10% reduction in overall labor costs on these jobs. The next piece of the puzzle is to ensure your 401(k) plan is properly designed to accept and maximize these contributions to your plan. This is why it is especially important to make sure you are working with a company that specializes in prevailing wage plans vs. traditional 401(k) plans. [/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container][fusion_builder_container type="flex" hundred_percent="no" hundred_percent_height="no" min_height="" hundred_percent_height_scroll="no" align_content="stretch" flex_align_items="flex-start" flex_justify_content="flex-start" flex_column_spacing="" hundred_percent_height_center_content="yes" equal_height_columns="no" container_tag="div" menu_anchor="" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" status="published" publish_date="" class="" id="" link_color="" link_hover_color="" border_sizes_top="" border_sizes_right="" border_sizes_bottom="" border_sizes_left="" border_color="" border_style="solid" margin_top_medium="" margin_bottom_medium="" margin_top_small="" margin_bottom_small="" margin_top="" margin_bottom="" padding_top_medium="" padding_right_medium="" padding_bottom_medium="" padding_left_medium="" padding_top_small="" padding_right_small="" padding_bottom_small="" padding_left_small="" padding_top="" padding_right="" padding_bottom="" padding_left="" box_shadow="no" box_shadow_vertical="" box_shadow_horizontal="" box_shadow_blur="0" box_shadow_spread="0" box_shadow_color="" box_shadow_style="" z_index="" overflow="" gradient_start_position="0" gradient_end_position="100" gradient_type="linear" radial_direction="center center" linear_angle="180" background_color="" background_image="" background_position="center center" background_repeat="no-repeat" fade="no" background_parallax="none" enable_mobile="no" parallax_speed="0.3" background_blend_mode="none" video_mp4="" video_webm="" video_ogv="" video_url="" video_aspect_ratio="16:9" video_loop="yes" video_mute="yes" video_preview_image="" absolute="off" absolute_devices="small,medium,large" sticky="off" sticky_devices="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" sticky_background_color="" sticky_height="" sticky_offset="" sticky_transition_offset="0" scroll_offset="0" animation_type="" animation_direction="left" animation_speed="0.3" animation_offset="" filter_hue="0" filter_saturation="100" filter_brightness="100" filter_contrast="100" filter_invert="0" filter_sepia="0" filter_opacity="100" filter_blur="0" filter_hue_hover="0" filter_saturation_hover="100" filter_brightness_hover="100" filter_contrast_hover="100" filter_invert_hover="0" filter_sepia_hover="0" filter_opacity_hover="100" filter_blur_hover="0" admin_label="1 Plan Better 2"][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" layout="1_1" align_self="auto" content_layout="column" align_content="flex-start" content_wrap="wrap" spacing="" center_content="no" link="" target="_self" min_height="" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" sticky_display="normal,sticky" class="" id="" order_medium="0" order_small="0" hover_type="none" border_color="" border_style="solid" box_shadow="no" box_shadow_blur="0" box_shadow_spread="0" box_shadow_color="" box_shadow_style="" background_type="single" gradient_start_position="0" gradient_end_position="100" gradient_type="linear" radial_direction="center center" linear_angle="180" background_color="" background_image="" background_image_id="" background_position="left top" background_repeat="no-repeat" background_blend_mode="none" animation_type="" animation_direction="left" animation_speed="0.3" animation_offset="" filter_type="regular" filter_hue="0" filter_saturation="100" filter_brightness="100" filter_contrast="100" filter_invert="0" filter_sepia="0" filter_opacity="100" filter_blur="0" filter_hue_hover="0" filter_saturation_hover="100" filter_brightness_hover="100" filter_contrast_hover="100" filter_invert_hover="0" filter_sepia_hover="0" filter_opacity_hover="100" filter_blur_hover="0" last="true" border_position="all" first="true"][fusion_text columns="" column_min_width="" column_spacing="" rule_style="default" rule_size="" rule_color="" content_alignment_medium="" content_alignment_small="" content_alignment="" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" sticky_display="normal,sticky" class="" id="" font_size="" fusion_font_family_text_font="" fusion_font_variant_text_font="" line_height="" letter_spacing="" text_color="" animation_type="" animation_direction="left" animation_speed="0.3" animation_offset=""]

One Plan is Better than Two

One common misconception is contractors thinking they need to setup and manage two separate retirement plans – one for prevailing wage employees and one for non-prevailing wage employees. While this type of arrangement is possible, it comes with added costs and risks. Managing two retirement plans doubles the fees you are paying, increases administrative work, and increases your fiduciary and compliance risks. 401(k) providers who specialize in prevailing wage plans can offer one plan to fit the needs of your business and all of your employees. Another way for employers to improve their 401(k) plan is by using fringe dollars to offset or meet matching requirements that they may choose to include in their plan. This includes discretionary employer match, safe harbor, or profit-sharing contributions to the plan. Contractors are often hesitant to include matching contributions to their retirement plan due to the costs. Utilizing the prevailing wage dollars to meet a portion of these contributions allows you to offer more retirement benefits to all your employees at a reduced cost to the company. Required annual compliance testing for all 401(k) plans can be extremely complicated and are put into place to ensure that all participants are benefiting equally from the plan. When working with a plan administrator who specializes in designing retirement plans for prevailing wage contractors, you can ensure that you are staying compliant and offering the best solution for all your employees and the owners of the company. Beneco has been in business for over 30 years helping prevailing wage contractors navigate the challenges and complexities of these jobs. Please
reach out to us to learn more about how we can help support you and your business in the years ahead. [/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]" target="_blank">401(k) Plans: What Prevailing Wage Contractors Need to Know

Contractors who have been competing in the prevailing wage market are typically well-versed in the rules, regulations, and reporting requirements that come with these [...]

By |2022-07-18T14:36:02-05:00February 17th, 2021|AM Whitepaper, CICPAC, Construction|

  • Track costs against budgets.
  • View and store important documentation such as RFIs, jobsite progress photos, and project issues.
  • Easily collaborate with field teams, office staff, subs, vendors, and clients.
  • Check out these five undeniable benefits of using cloud project management software coupled with cloud construction management software.
    1. Track Projects in Real Time
    2. Eliminate Costly Delays
    3. Automate Workflows to Increase Collaboration
    4. Streamline and Enhance Communication
    5. Log on Anytime, from Anywhere
    [/fusion_text][fusion_button link="https://www.acumatica.com/blog/5-benefits-cloud-construction-management-software/" text_transform="" title="" target="_self" link_attributes="" alignment_medium="" alignment_small="" alignment="" modal="" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" sticky_display="normal,sticky" class="" id="" color="default" button_gradient_top_color="" button_gradient_bottom_color="" button_gradient_top_color_hover="" button_gradient_bottom_color_hover="" accent_color="" accent_hover_color="" type="" bevel_color="" border_width="" border_radius="" border_color="" border_hover_color="" size="" stretch="default" margin_top="" margin_right="" margin_bottom="" margin_left="" icon="" icon_position="left" icon_divider="no" animation_type="" animation_direction="left" animation_speed="0.3" animation_offset=""]Continue Reading[/fusion_button][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]" target="_blank">5 Undeniable Benefits of Cloud Construction Management Software

    The pressure to stay up to date on current projects has been a thorn in the side of many contractors. Poor communication has derailed [...]

    By |2022-07-18T14:36:02-05:00January 28th, 2021|AM Whitepaper, CICPAC, Construction, Resources|

    Viewpoint recently released an ebook on "Going Paperless: The Digital Construction Organization." The digital construction company includes a move to paperless that seamlessly connect the back office, the project team and the field crews. Here is a short excerpt and link to download the book: Paperwork is more than just a headache, it’s also a liability. According to Construction Business Owner, 70 percent of businesses would fail in three weeks if they experienced a catastrophic loss of paperwork. It takes an average of 18 minutes for someone to locate a particular document, which can cut into efficiency, and the cost of paper per employee is $80 — even more reasons companies in all industries are trying to ditch paper. In construction, each new project comes with a mountain of paperwork, including bid documents, payroll and subcontracts, making finding a specific piece of information time-consuming and complicated — not to mention the storage space required to maintain proper records. To solve these problems, many contractors are digitizing processes and documentation as a way to speed access to information across office, team and field personnel. With 50 percent of project management teams still using manual processes, there’s much to be gained by adopting construction-specific technology to go paperless. The ebook contains sections on:
    • the Benefits of Going Paperless,
    • What to Look for In Technology, and
    • How to go Paperless.
    [/fusion_text][fusion_button link="https://www.viewpoint.com/resource-library/ebooks/going-paperless-the-digital-construction-organization" text_transform="" title="" target="_blank" link_attributes="" alignment_medium="" alignment_small="" alignment="" modal="" hide_on_mobile="small-visibility,medium-visibility,large-visibility" sticky_display="normal,sticky" class="" id="" color="default" button_gradient_top_color="" button_gradient_bottom_color="" button_gradient_top_color_hover="" button_gradient_bottom_color_hover="" accent_color="" accent_hover_color="" type="" bevel_color="" border_width="" border_radius="" border_color="" border_hover_color="" size="" stretch="default" margin_top="" margin_right="" margin_bottom="" margin_left="" icon="" icon_position="left" icon_divider="no" animation_type="" animation_direction="left" animation_speed="0.3" animation_offset=""]Download Book Now[/fusion_button][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]" target="_blank">Going Paperless – The Digital Construction Organization, Viewpoint

    Our friends at Viewpoint recently released an ebook on "Going Paperless: The Digital Construction Organization." The digital construction company includes a move to paperless [...]

    By |2022-07-18T14:36:02-05:00January 22nd, 2021|AM Whitepaper, CICPAC, Construction|
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